Stuart gave an enthralling 90-minute presentation of fly tying during which he tied 4 dry fly patterns and gave many fly tying and fly fishing tips.  In particular, he recommended the practice of tying several flies at one sitting aiming for consistency. He used a pair calliper to ensure that tails, thorax and body were the same lengths in each fly.  He also mentioned fishing tactics reminding everyone not to neglect the use of ‘down-stream’ presentation of flies as this gave them a natural appearance.

The Posh Olive

Hook: Size 14 Partridge SUD 40 dry fly hook
Thread: Olive 8/0 thread.
Tail: Coq De Leon; 6 – 8 fibres.
Dubbing: Fine light olive poly dubbing (Orvis fly rite) tied very sparingly.
Wing: Two natural CDC feathers – placed back to back (curving away from each other).
Thorax and head: Dark olive pine squirrel fur as dubbing.

Emerging Midge (Chironomid)

Hook: Size 22 Varivas 2200 BL.
Thread: Olive 8/0 thread.
Body: Fine light olive poly dubbing (Orvis fly-rite) tied very sparingly.
Outriggers: Veniards Micro Flash.
Wing: Fine poly yarn.
Thorax and head: Mole fur as dubbing.

Thread started at the curve of the hook with touching turns around the bend.  Very sparse dubbing applied with thread turns back to start of thread. Single strand of micro flash tied-in to near side then turned back to produce outriggers on either side of hook and cut to length (to curve of hook).  

Thread then taken to eye with touching turns and fine poly yarn wing tied in approx. 1 mm from the eye and cut to size (Stuart mentioned that a single CDC feather could be used as an alternative winging material, but that this could be problematic on cold days so he felt that poly yarn was the better). Mole fur (one of the finest dubbings) was sparingly used to provide a darker coloured thorax.

Tying very small flies relied on careful use of materials ensuring that excess is not used as it could spoil the fly appearance.

Stuart used this as a single fly when the fish were only rising for small flies such as aphids.

The Wedding Day May Fly

Hook: Size 10 long shank dry fly hook.
Thread: Olive 8/0 thread.
Shuck (tail): Tan poly yarn.
Wing: Pink (or white) poly yarn with a 2 -3 mm width of black ether foam tied underneath.
Body/thorax: Tan or cream dubbing.Parachute
Hackle: Dyed olive Grizzle cock hackle feather.

Thread started at the eye of the hook with touching turns the length of the shank.  The poly yarn shuck (at least twice length of hook shank) tied in with thread to provide a shuck length equal to that of the hook shank with touching turns back to the eye (full length of hook).

The pink (or white) poly yarn wing tied in across the hook, approx. 3mm from the eye and posted with ‘figure of 8’ turns.  The hackle feather tied in over the eye of the hook with the rachis towards the bend. Approx. 20 mm length of black ether foam (2-3 mm wide) was laid under the wing and used to ‘sandwich’ the poly yarn and hackle feather and tied in place with ‘posting’ turns of the thread.  Thread then taken back to the bend and the body dubbed with tan (or cream) dubbing all the way up to the eye of the hook. The hackle was then wound around the wing post starting at the highest point and winding down. The hackle feather was tied in and the fly whip finished at the eye.

The Skippy Sedge

Hook: Size 12 Partridge SLD dry fly.
Thread: Pale green 8/0.
Tail: Butt of green dubbing.
Body: Pine squirrel dubbing generously applied.
Wing: Three natural coloured CDC feathers tied in 2mm from the eye (with quills over the eye): one on near-side, one on top and one on far-side.

This fly was developed for the 2001 world championships in Sweden and can be used throughout the year as Caddis hatch in every month.  

Thread tied on at eye with touching turns the length of the hook shank.  A sparsely dubbed bead of light green applied to butt, followed by a ‘chunky’ body of brown pine squirrel dubbing to thorax region.

CDC wing is tied in one feather at a time and each adjusted to length by pulling the rachis.

Head finished with more dubbing and CDC feather ends cut over the eye of the hook.

The fly is best fished in fast-moving currents so that it sinks at the end of the drift – as the final retrieve mimics the Caddis returning to the surface after egg-laying.

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